Life Under the Microscope: Toxoplasma gondii

Toxoplasma gondii is the causative agent of the disease known as toxoplasmosis. The parasite was first discovered by Charles Nicolle and Louis Manceaux in 1908 while working with the rodent Ctenodactylus gundi. They initially named the parasite Leishmania gondii thinking that it belonged to the Leishmania genus. However, once they realized they discovered a new organism, they named it Toxoplasma gondii, from the Greek toxo, meaning arc or bow, and plasma, meaning something that is shaped or molded.  The parasite’s definitive host is the cat in which T. gondii can sexually reproduce.

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Toxoplasma gondii

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George Papadopoulos – Math Education PhD student

**George Papadopoulos is a PhD student at the University of Sydney, in Sydney Australia, focusing on Tertiary Mathematics Education whilst also working as a lecturer and tutor within the university. After meeting George last year in Greece, it was clear his interest and passion for science and research was boundless, as he is always searching for the truth and logic behind everything. During this interview, he will describe his current and past educational and research experiences.**

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George Papadopoulos, PhD student at the University of Sydney

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Life Under the Microscope: Trypanosoma brucei

First discovered by Sir David Bruce in 1894 and appropriately named after him, Trypanosoma brucei is the causative agent of African trypanosomiasis, also known as “sleeping sickness”. It is prevalent in tropical and subtropical regions of Africa. Trypanosoma brucei consists of a group of three organisms: T. brucei gambiense, T. brucei rhodesiense, and T. brucei brucei. While all of these organisms cause trypanosomiasis, T. brucei brucei only infects animals and is not pathogenic in humans. All of these organisms within the disease share the same vector, the tsetse fly.

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Tsetse fly, the vector of African trypanosomiasis

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